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Sarcoma Treatment Options

Sarcoma Treatment Options

For each stage of soft tissue sarcoma, there are different treatment options available. Some of the options that may be offered by your doctor are as follows:

Stage I Sarcoma:

  • Surgery (wide local excision or Mohs microsurgery).
  • Radiation therapy before and/or after surgery.

If cancer is found in the head, neck, abdomen, or chest, treatment may include the following:

  • Surgery.
  • Radiation therapy before or after surgery.
  • Fast neutron radiation therapy.

Stages II and III adult soft tissue sarcoma treatments include:

  • Surgery (wide local excision).
  • Surgery (wide local excision) with radiation therapy, for large tumors.
  • High-dose radiation therapy for tumors that cannot be removed by surgery.
  • Radiation therapy or chemotherapy before limb-sparing surgery. Radiation therapy may also be given after surgery.
  • A clinical trial of surgery followed by chemotherapy, for large tumors.

Stage IV adult soft tissue sarcoma that involves lymph nodes may include the following treatments:

  • Surgery (wide local excision) with or without lymphadenectomy. Radiation therapy may also be given after surgery.
  • Radiation therapy before and after surgery.
  • A clinical trial of surgery followed by chemotherapy.

Treatment of stage IV adult soft tissue sarcoma that involves internal organs of the body may include the following:

  • Surgery (wide local excision).
  • Surgery to remove as much of the tumor as possible, followed by radiation therapy.
  • High-dose radiation therapy, with or without chemotherapy, for tumors that cannot be removed by surgery.
  • Chemotherapy with 1 or more anticancer drugs, before surgery or as palliative therapy to relieve symptoms and improve the quality of life.
  • A clinical trial of chemotherapy with or without stem cell transplant.
  • A clinical trial of chemotherapy following surgery to remove cancer that has spread to the lungs.

Treatment for recurring sarcoma may be somewhat different and will be guided by your cancer treatment team of physicians and nurses.